Digital Literacy

As I was scanning through the results of my “what does digital literacy mean?” via google, I quickly found that digital literacy is difficult to define. The websites that I did visit very briefly explained, but they did not go into very full details. I did learn that digital literacy is being able to understand information and utilize information that is found through the internet. There is a great emphasis on being able to find and correctly use information, while also being able to evaluate and communicate it.

Technology is always expanding and growing. It’s role in classrooms has increased over years, and will probably continue it’s upward climb. Students will need to be prepared to face technology in the classroom, as well as the work force. Asking students to individually retrieve the information needed for assignment allows them to take control and forced them to rely on critical thinking. One could also only give partial directions. From there, the student must decide what the next steps are. They may come together as a class for solutions, search tutorials, or look at blogs to find solutions.

Creating digital fluency among students is vital. Computers are a resource and a tool that is available almost anywhere. Students should know how to effectively tap into the resource and how to use it for their gain. Many jobs have strong computer reliance, and students should be prepared for anything they may come up against. Digital literacy is a growing trend, and it will continue to grow as steadily as technology changes.

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One response to “Digital Literacy

  1. I love the idea of partial directions! So often students have been trained to have everything spelled out for them, which removes any possibility of surprise, discovery, wonder, or ownership. I will say, as a professor who often writes very partial directions on purpose, there can be some stiff student pushback. I’m not sure if it’s because it’s easier/less work to follow someone else’s directions than to forge your own path or if students think I have a hidden “guess what I’m really wanting” agenda that I’m just refusing to share with them.

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